Southeast Asia Globe presents the twelve shortlisted submissions in Transparency International Cambodia’s photographic competition in which entrants were asked to illustrate the negative effects of corruption

Twelve photos were selected by the judges for exhibition and the winning picture, taken by 24-year-old Ms Phim Kanika, shows a young boy outside of a classroom, illustrating the adverse impact of corruption on education.

“By creatively engaging people through art, we hope the photo exhibition can further mobilise interest, discussion and action among the residents of Cambodia, to push for a more just and equitable society,” said Elizabeth Johnson, research and advocacy programme manager at Transparency International Cambodia.

Kanika’s prize was an SLR camera and the winning image will grace the cover of Transparency International Cambodia’s next report on the country.

The photos will be on display at the German-Cambodian cultural centre, Meta House, until April 18.

Winner: “I Want to be One of Them”. Primary education in Cambodia is supposed to be free for all children. Yet the unofficial tutoring fees charged by teachers means that some children are unable to attend school. Teachers receive meagre salaries in Cambodia and often subsidise their wages through these unofficial payments. Photographer: Phim Kanika, female, 24

Winner: “I Want to be One of Them”. Primary education in Cambodia is supposed to be free for all children. Yet the unofficial tutoring fees charged by teachers means that some children are unable to attend school. Teachers receive meagre salaries in Cambodia and often subsidise their wages through these unofficial payments. Photographer: Phim Kanika, female, 24

First runner up: “Public Road for Private Business”. Around Orussey Market in Phnom Penh, private parking is spreading onto a public road, making it difficult for traffic to pass by. The commune authorities seem reluctant to take action against it. Photographer: Sun Vanndy, male, 26

First runner up: “Public Road for Private Business”. Around Orussey Market in Phnom Penh, private parking is spreading onto a public road, making it difficult for traffic to pass by. The commune authorities seem reluctant to take action against it. Photographer: Sun Vanndy, male, 26

Second runner up: Many families living at Preah Punlea Village, close to Phnom Penh, have been hurt by nearby industrial development. Major ponds and lakes have been filled in with sand to build modern housing complexes without adequate impact assessments being undertaken. Now when it rains the surrounding villages get flooded because there is nowhere for the rainwater to drain to. This little girl must walk through a flood in order to return to her home after school. Photographer: Seang Muoylay, male, 23

Second runner up: Many families living at Preah Punlea Village, close to Phnom Penh, have been hurt by nearby industrial development. Major ponds and lakes have been filled in with sand to build modern housing complexes without adequate impact assessments being undertaken. Now when it rains the surrounding villages get flooded because there is nowhere for the rainwater to drain to. This little girl must walk through a flood in order to return to her home
after school. Photographer: Seang Muoylay, male, 23

Runner up: Cambodia is affected by the virus of injustice. It is a barrier to sustainable growth in society. This image seeks to remind all relevant individuals or institutions that justice cannot be bought, and that all people have equal rights.           Photographer: Oum Nhean Piseth, male, 33

Runner up: Cambodia is affected by the virus of injustice. It is a barrier to sustainable growth in society. This image seeks to remind all relevant individuals or institutions that justice cannot be bought, and that all people have equal rights. Photographer: Oum Nhean Piseth, male, 33

Runner up: This young boy should be in school but instead he is forced to cast his fishing net in dirty waters because of poverty and the lack of access to free education. Corruption drives inequality, undermines opportunity and ultimately damages the everyday lives of Cambodian people. Photographer: Arvin Mamhot, male, 42.

Runner up: This young boy should be in school but instead he is forced to cast his fishing net in dirty waters because of poverty and the lack of access to free education. Corruption drives inequality, undermines opportunity and ultimately damages the everyday lives of Cambodian people. Photographer: Arvin Mamhot, male, 42.

Runner up: The iconic ‘white building’ in Phnom Penh was built in the 1960s for low-income residents. Although the building is now in poor condition, it continues to house numerous families; many of whom are low-income residents. This building in the heart of rapidly developing Phnom Penh underscores growing inequality, which is worsened by corruption. Photographer: Soeurn Sayorn Sonya, male, 21

Runner up: The iconic ‘white building’ in Phnom Penh was built in the 1960s for low-income residents. Although the building is now in poor condition, it continues to house numerous families; many of whom are low-income residents. This building in the heart of rapidly developing Phnom Penh underscores growing inequality, which is worsened by corruption. Photographer: Soeurn Sayorn Sonya, male, 21

Runner up: A man begs along the stairs to Phnom Oudong. Poverty and corruption go hand-in-hand. In Cambodia, approximately 30% of the population lives below the official poverty line. Corruption both causes and exacerbates poverty in the country. Toni Marie Despojo-Dumler, Female, 26

Runner up: A man begs along the stairs to Phnom Oudong. Poverty and corruption go hand-in-hand. In Cambodia, approximately 30% of the population lives below the official poverty line. Corruption both causes and exacerbates poverty in the country. Toni Marie Despojo-Dumler, Female, 26

Runner up: Two pockets representing two nations. The tear of corruption rips apart one of the countries. There is less money in the right-hand pocket because national revenue and investment are lost to corruption.  Photographer: Sun Thearak Trodim, male, 25

Runner up: Two pockets representing two nations. The tear of corruption rips apart one of the countries. There is less money in the right-hand pocket because national revenue and investment are lost to corruption. Photographer: Sun Thearak Trodim, male, 25

Runner up: Students are each supposed to have their own school book, yet some of the books intended for the classroom never arrive. Photographer: Pech Ouksaphea, male, 30

Runner up: Students are each supposed to have their own school book, yet some of the books intended for the classroom never arrive. Photographer: Pech Ouksaphea, male, 30

Runner up: Money can buy a licence but not a life. A driver’s licence in Cambodia costs $100 and can be obtained without any proper driving training or testing. Such corruption contributes to the daily loss of lives in road traffic accidents.           Photographer: Eng Vannak, male, 31

Runner up: Money can buy a licence but not a life. A driver’s licence in Cambodia costs $100 and can be obtained without any proper driving training or testing. Such corruption contributes to the daily loss of lives in road traffic accidents.  Photographer: Eng Vannak, male, 31

Runner up: Sand dredging is a big problem because it causes damage to housing, roads and infrastructure.                  Photographer: Oeun Rosnovomren, male, 29

Runner up: Sand dredging is a big problem because it causes damage to housing, roads and infrastructure. Photographer: Oeun Rosnovomren, male, 29

Runner up: Some teachers regularly demand unofficial fees from school children for classes that should be free. For families who cannot afford these extra payments this might mean having to take their children out of school. Instead of getting an education, these children work to support their families. Photographer: Sun Vanndy, male, 26

Runner up: Some teachers regularly demand unofficial fees from school children for classes that should be free. For families who cannot afford these extra payments this might mean having to take their children out of school. Instead of getting an education, these children work to support their families. Photographer: Sun Vanndy, male, 26

Source: www.sea-globe.com

 

Categories: Photography

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